Finding a Raspberry Pi on your network

So, you know you have a Raspberry Pi operating in your home, connected to your WiFi, but you don't know its address.

nmap is a command that will help you find it by scanning for machines on your network. Running this command from Terminal will look for all local machines with port 22 open:

nmap -p 22 10.0.1.0/24  

The output should look like:

Starting Nmap 7.12 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2017-06-21 19:23 EDT  
Nmap scan report for 10.0.1.1  
Host is up (0.0014s latency).  
PORT   STATE  SERVICE  
22/tcp closed ssh

Nmap scan report for 10.0.1.2  
Host is up (0.00048s latency).  
PORT   STATE  SERVICE  
22/tcp closed ssh

Nmap scan report for 10.0.1.4  
Host is up (0.012s latency).  
PORT   STATE  SERVICE  
22/tcp closed ssh

Nmap scan report for 10.0.1.17  
Host is up (0.014s latency).  
PORT   STATE  SERVICE  
22/tcp closed ssh

Nmap scan report for 10.0.1.18  
Host is up (0.014s latency).  
PORT   STATE SERVICE  
22/tcp open  ssh

Nmap scan report for 10.0.1.20  
Host is up (0.013s latency).  
PORT   STATE SERVICE  
22/tcp open  ssh

Nmap done: 256 IP addresses (6 hosts up) scanned in 2.68 seconds  

If your local IP address is like 192.168.0.10, then change the command to say 192.168.0.0/24.

The first entry is the router on my network.

The next three are 1) my Apple TV, 2) my wife's iPhone and 3) my laptop.

The last two entries are two Raspberry Pi Zero W's running as cameras.